One of the oldest medicinal herbs is in full use to this day …

The Latin name is Sambucus nigra, and in our traditional medicine, the boxwood is still called Elderberries. It grows everywhere, in humid and neglected places, but along roads and in yards. It blooms in May and June and matures in September, so this time is great to say two words about this medicinal herb.

The young leaves are harvested in April and May, and the flowers are harvested during flowering in May and June when they have a beautiful milky white color. Later in the summer they change their color and are no longer suitable for use. It is also important to note that flower collection is done in dry and sunny weather, otherwise, they change color quickly and lose quality.

Elders have antiviral, antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic effects. It is particularly rich in flavonoids that prevent cell damage. One of the most significant effects of elders tea is the stimulation of sweating and wetting, which comes from the ability to lower the thermoregulation center stimulation threshold. Tea can be made from leaves and flowers.

The positive effects of sweating are a decrease in body temperature and release of accumulated toxic substances, so this tea can be an effective therapy for all high-temperature associated diseases such as viral infections, influenza, colds, rheumatic diseases, bronchitis, in the early stages. lungs.

Studies have shown that elderberries can reduce symptoms and shorten the duration of the flu. Beverage tea is brewed so that 50 grams of fresh or dried flowers are sprinkled with 1 liter of water and left for about 10 minutes.

The tea is then drained and drank a few glasses a day.

Also used is the elderberries fruit, which matures in September. The fruits are in the form of berries and can be made into jam and wine. Vitamin C, rich in vitamin C and anthocyanins, is an effective medicine for relieving stomach cramps, gas and constipation, as it stimulates the work of the digestive tract.

Bean juice is a refreshing drink that anyone can drink on warm summer days. The recipe is as follows:

7 liters of water is boiled, then cooled. The flowers are put into the water together with 1 kg of sugar and juice of 7 lemons. Allow to stand for 1-2 days, then drain in bottles and drink after 6 weeks.

The recipe for elderberries syrup is a measure of approximately 4 liters of syrup – feel free to adjust the quantity to your liking. This means that 10 blossoms use one liter of water, one kilogram of sugar and one lemon, ie 100 blossoms will require 10 liters of water, 10 kilos of sugar and 10 lemons, preferably inhaled.

You will also need a larger container and more glass bottles with closures. As for the lighter variant of this recipe with less sugar, keep one in mind – sugar is a natural preservative, and by reducing its amount in preparation, you run the risk of short term syrup.

Ingredients needed:

• 30 bosom flowers

• 3 liters of water

• 400 gr. lemon acid

• 3 lemons

• 3 kg of sugar

Preparation:

1. Soak the elderberries flowers in water, then add the citric acid and the lemon, chopped. Stir well and allow to stand for 24 hours in a cool, dark place.

2. The next day, drain the liquid, then add the sugar and mix well. Allow standing for another 24 hours, stirring occasionally.

3. After 48 hours, the syrup is ready for storage in glass bottles. This way you can keep the syrup from the elderberries for up to a year, well kept in a cool, dark place.

To make syrup from the elderberries, select the ripe black elders, and if there are any green beans, be sure to dispose of them as they are poisonous!

Wash and arrange them in a large jar, rows of fruits, sugar up. Cover the jar with gauze and let it ferment for about 2 weeks. Then drain in gauze and spread the mixture into smaller jars or bottles. Close and place in a dark and cool place.

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